Academic year
2010/2011
Department
Department of Philosophy
University
Yale Unniversity
Itinerary
Itinerary 2 Practical Philosophy
Module
Module 5. Research Seminar in Practical Philosophy
Code
565865
Credits
5
Language
English
Schedule
9 to 12.
Location
Wednesday: Room 40.043. Friday: Room 40.149. Faculty of Philosophy. UPF.

Description

The increasingly widespread expression “global justice” marks an important shift in the
structure of our moral discourse.

Traditionally, international relations were seen as sharply distinct from the domain of domestic
justice. The former focused on interactions among states, while the latter evaluated the design
of a national institutional order in light of its effects on its individual participants.

Such institutional moral analysis is now being applied also to supranational institutional
arrangements whose effects are becoming ever more pervasive and important for the lives of
individuals. This suggests a new responsibility for the governments and citizens of the more
powerful countries: a shared responsibility for any injustice in supranational institutional
arrangements.

This course will trace the debates about whether there is such a responsibility, about plausible
standards for assessing the justice of supranational institutional arrangements, about how well
current supranational institutional arrangements are doing by these standards, and about what
institutional reforms might bring us closer to achieving global justice.

 

TITLES OF THE TEN LESSONS:

1.

What is global justice?

2.

A traditional view: John Rawls’s Law of Peoples

3.

The traditional view defended: Blake and Nagel

4.

Human rights as furnishing a core conception of global justice

5.

The magnitude, evolution, and geographical distribution of human rights deficits

6.

The Millennium Development Goals

7.

WTO globalization and economic inequality

8.

Pharmaceutical innovation and access

9.

Bad governance sustained through lending, resource purchases, arms sales, and corruption

10. Focusing on the most promising institutional reforms


Bibliography

Shaohua Chen and Martin Ravallion, “The Developing World is Poorer than We Thought, but no Less
Successful in the Fight against Poverty,” World Bank Policy Research Working Paper WPS 4703
(2008), 34; available at econ.worldbank.org/docsearch.

Thomas Nagel, “The Problem of Global Justice,” Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (2005), 113-47.

Thomas Pogge, Hacer justicia a la humanidad, Spanish translation by David Álvarez García (Ciudad
de Mexico: Fondo de Cultura Económica 2009).

Thomas Pogge, World Poverty and Human Rights: Cosmopolitan Responsibilities and Reforms
(Cambridge: Polity Press 2002 and expanded second edition 2008), Spanish translation by
Ernesto Weikert: La Pobreza en el Mundo y los Derechos Humanos (Barcelona: Paidos 2005).

Thomas Pogge and Keith Horton, eds., Global Ethics: Seminal Essays, (St. Paul: Paragon House
2008).

John Rawls, The Law of Peoples (Cambridge: Harvard University Press 1999).