Events

23 Jan 2020

Universals in Music? Perspectives from Ethnomusicology and Music Archaeology”. Talk by Raquel Jiménez Pasalodos

Next week, Raquel Jiménez Pasalodos, ethnomusicologist and research collaborator in the Artsoundscapes Project, will deliver the talk “Universals in Music? Perspectives from Ethnomusicology and Music Archaeology” within the 8th Barcelona Lecture Series in Brain, Cognition and Behavior. The event will take place on Tuesday, 28 January, at 3 pm, in Sala Graus (Edifici Ponent) of the Faculty of Psychology (Campus Mundet) at the University of Barcelona.

Download the information about this event here.

ABSTRACT:

The study of music universals was discarded by modern ethnomusicology around the 1940s. Such a rejection was based on an increasing awareness on the weak theoretical goals and methodological basis of this quest because of its links to 19th century evolutionism and ethnocentrism. Overcoming this dismissal of universals, a new interest in them emerged in the 1960s. This novel acceptance can be contextualized in other proposals put forward in different fields such as Chomsky´s universal grammar and Lévi-Strauss structural study of world myths. Despite this interest and the many publications issued, attempts such as those proposed by Lomax´s Cantometrics and Choreometrics were deemed to be a failure by most. In the last two decades, however, new methodologies coming from psychology and neuroscience have put music universals back on the table, and some major ethnomusicologists have even claimed for the need of a collaboration between music anthropologists and neuroscientists. Nevertheless, recent projects such as the Natural History of Song have been received with skepticism among a large part of the ethnomusicological community. In this presentation, I will explore the historiographical trail of the study of universals in music from the perspectives of ethnomusicology and music archaeology. I will also discuss the extent to which some research questions may be shared by anthropological, cognitive and neuroscientific approaches to human musicality.

23 Jan 2020

Call for papers: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology (EAA 2020, 26-30 August, Budapest)

Call for Papers: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA)
Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020

You are cordially invited to present your research in the session “Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology” in the 26th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) in Budapest, Hungary, 26–30 August 2020. Please submit your paper abstract (150–300 words) by 13 February 2020 via the EAA website: https://submissions.e-a-a.org/eaa2020/. General information about the conference, venue, fees and detailed guidelines can be found on: https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2020
Please forward this invitation to anyone you think may be interested. If you have any questions, please email one the session organisers: Raquel Jimenez (raquel.jimenez@uva.es), Margarita Díaz-Andreu (m.diaz-andreu@ub.edu) Rupert Till (R.Till@hud.ac.uk)

Session #124: Archaeology of Soundscapes and Soundscapes for Archaeology
Theme 5. Theories and methods in archaeology: interactions between disciplines

Abstract:
Soundscapes – both natural and human – are an important study for those interested in the past. Ethnomusicologists have shown that soundscapes can shape cultural knowledge, including not only musical aesthetics and symbolic meanings associated with sound, but also religious beliefs, memories, emotions, and even social behaviours. In natural landscapes, human beings are surrounded by a rich sonic cosmos in which to create, reinforce, or contest their world views. Moreover, anthropic soundscapes delineate human cultures and are able to mark time, frame ritual contexts, establish borders in the landscape, reinforce or separate cultural identities, and even define sacredness, power, and prestige. Music archaeology and archaeoacoustics have laid the methodological basis for reflecting on the possibilities of unveiling past anthropic soundscapes and musical and acoustic behaviours, as well as the relations of these with both ecology and culture.

For this session, we welcome proposals that reflect on the importance of soundscapes in past and present cultures and examine different methodological and theoretical approaches to the study and reconstruction of past soundscapes through for example archaeoacoustics, archaeological finds, iconographies, written sources and ethnographic comparisons. We also encourage discussions about ancient musical instruments and their relation to both natural sounds and acoustics, along with their presence in anthropic soundscapes. Presentations on projects dealing with the use of sounds, music or reconstructed soundscapes in the dissemination of archaeological heritage will be also welcomed. In particular, we would like to receive proposals for papers that reflect on the possibilities of enhancing the experiences and involvement of visitors to archaeological contexts through sound. Finally, we also invite ethnomusicologists to share their reflections on the interactions of soundscapes and culture, such as the presence of acoustic phenomena in myths, the use of particular acoustic conditions in rituals, or the creation of ritual soundscapes.

30 Oct 2019

Immersive narratives at the 4th Seminar on Cultural Heritage in Barcelona

This week, our colleague José Valenzuela, PhD Candidate in the Artsoundscapes Project, is attending the IV Jornada de Patrimoni Cultural [4th Seminar on Cultural Heritage] which takes place on Wednesday, 30 October 2019, at the La Pedrera Auditorium in Barcelona. The event is devoted to the use of mappings, escape rooms, virtual reality and video games in creating immersive narratives and communicating cultural heritage to the various types of audiences.

Read more about this event here.

30 Oct 2019

Prof. Margarita Díaz-Andreu opening the latest conference series of the Jakiunde Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters in Spain

Prof. Margarita Díaz-Andreu, Principal Investigator of the Artsoundscapes Project, was invited by the Jakiunde Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters in Spain to open its newest conference series, “Las ciencias suenan” [The sciences sound], with the talk “Más allá del sonido – Una mirada alternativa desde la arqueoacústica a los mitos y creencias religiosas de las sociedades prehistóricas” [Beyond sound: The myths and religious beliefs of prehistoric societies from the perspective of archaeoacoustics”]. The event took place on 30 October 2019, at the Museum of Navarre in Pamplona.

Read more about this event here.

29 Apr 2019

Prof. Margarita Díaz-Andreu at the conference “Fazer com tod@s. Jornadas – Arqueologia, Museus e Comunidade(s)” in Portugal

The Principal Investigator of the Artsoundscapes Project, Prof. Margarita Díaz-Andreu, participated as a guest speaker at the conference “Fazer com tod@s. Jornadas – Arqueologia, Museus e Comunidade(s)” which she opened with the talk “Arqueología, museos y comunidades – una apuesta de futuro”. The event was organized by RIBACVDANA – Associação de Fronteira para o Desenvolvimento Comunitário and took place at Museu do Côa in Portugal, on 26 and 27 April 2019. The Côa Museum is managed by the Archaeological Park of the Côa Valley which is known for its fantastic prehistoric rock art sites classified as World Heritage by UNESCO. After the conference, dr. Díaz-Andreu visited the Siega Verde prehistoric rock art site in Spain, together with Portuguese archaeologists José Paulo Francisco and Carlos Vázquez. Siega Verde is part of the rock art sites of the Côa Valley in northeastern Portugal, near the border with Spain.

7 Mar 2019

Prof. Margarita Díaz-Andreu at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge

Prof. Margarita Díaz-Andreu, the Principal Investigator of the Artsoundscapes Project, gave a talk on “Rock art soundscapes: reflecting on the challenges ahead” at the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research of the University of Cambridge. The event was organized within the Garrod Research Seminars on 7 March, from 4 to 5 pm, at the McDonald Institute Seminar Room. At the lecture, Prof. Díaz-Andreu met again with Prof. Marie Louise Stig-Sørensen from the Department of Archaeology, with whom she edited the now famous book “Excavating Women: A History of Women in European Archaeology”, back in 1998.

Read more information here.

16 Jan 2019

Lecture on “Sounds & The Sacred in Rock Art Soundscapes” at Bath Spa University, UK

Prof. Margarita Díaz-Andreu, the Principal Investigator of the Artsoundscapes Project, was invited to deliver a lecture on “Sounds & the Sacred in Rock Art Soundscapes” at Bath Spa University in the United Kingdom. Her talk centred on the acoustics of landscapes, especially of those marked by past communities with prehistoric rock art as a way of providing them with a special meaning. The event took place on 16 January 2019, at 2 pm, in the Newton Park Campus of the Bath Spa University.

29 Nov 2018

Celebration of the 20 years since the rock art of the Iberian Mediterranean Basin

Margarita Díaz-Andreu and Tommaso Mattioli’s attendance to the celebration of the 20 years since the rock art of the Iberian Mediterranean Basin was declared World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Organized at the Centro de Interpretación del Cogul (ARQA), Cogul, by the Roca dels Moros rock art shelter.

Read more information at rutadelartrupestre.cat