UESD

Unexpected Event during Survey Design

 

 

 

Studies published in 2021
  1. Brugarolas, Pablo, and Luis Miller. 2021. “The Causal Effect of Polls on Turnout Intention: A Local Randomization Regression Discontinuity Approach.” Political Analysis, forthcoming.
  2. Bol, Damien, Marco Giani, André Blais, and Peter J. Loewen. 2021. “The Effect of COVID‐19 Lockdowns on Political Support: Some Good News for Democracy?” European Journal of Political Research 60(2):497–505.
  3. Curtice, Travis. 2021. “How Repression A ffects Public Perceptions of Police: Evidence from Uganda.” Journal of Conflict Resolution, forthcoming.
  4. Giani, Marco. 2021. “Fear Without Prejudice in the Shadow of Jihadist Threat.” Comparative Political Studies 54(6):1058–1085.
  5. Merler, Silvia. 2021. “Technocracy, Trust and Democracy: Evidence on Citizens’ Attitudes from a Natural Experiment in Italy.” Government and Opposition 56(2):301–325.
  6. Müller, Stefan, and Liam Kneafsey. 2021. “Evidence for the Irrelevance of Irrelevant Events.” https://muellerstefan.net/papers/mueller_kneafsey_irrelevance_irrelevant_events.pdf.
  7. Turnbull-Dugarte, Stuart J, and José Rama. 2021. “When the US Far-right Sneezes, the European Far-right Catches a Cold. Quasi-experimental of Electoral Contagion from Spain.” OSF Preprints. https://doi.org/10.31219/osf.io/s6fmj.
Studies published in 2020
  1. Ait Bihi Ouali, Laila. 2020. “Effects of Signalling Tax Evasion on Redistribution and Voting Preferences: Evidence from the Panama Papers.” PLoS ONE 15(3):e0229394.
  2. Belmonte, Alessandro. 2020. “Inter-ethnic Dynamics in the Wake of Terrorist Attacks: Evidence from the 2015 Baga Massacre.” Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy. https://doi.org/10.1515/peps-2020-0009.
  3. Bridgman, Aengus, Costin Ciobanu, Aaron Erlich, Danielle Bohonos, and Christopher Ross. 2020. “Unveiling: the Electoral Consequences of an Exogenous Mid-campaign Court Ruling.” The Journal of Politics, forthcoming
  4. Casas, Agustín, Federico Curci, and Antoni-Italo De Moragas. 2020. “Checks and Balances and Nation Building: The Spanish Constitutional Court and Catalonia.” SIOE Conference: 2020.
  5. Depetris-Chauvin, Emilio, Ruben Durante, and Felipe R. Campante. 2020. “Building Nations Through Shared Experiences: Evidence from African Football.” American Economic Review 110(5):1572–1602.
  6. Ferrín, Mónica, Moreno Mancosu, and Teresa M. Cappiali. 2020. “Terrorist Attacks and Europeans’ Attitudes Towards Immigrants: An Experimental Approach.” European Journal of Political Research 59(3):491–516.
  7. De Vries, Catherine E., Bert N. Bakker, Sara Hobolt, and Kevin Arceneaux. 2020. “Crisis Signaling: How Italy’s Coronavirus Lockdown Affected Incumbent Support in Other European Countries.” SSRN. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3606149.
  8. Falcó-Gimeno, Albert, and Pablo Fernandez-Vazquez. 2020. “Choices That Matter: Coalition Formation and Parties’ Ideological Reputations.” Political Science Research and Methods 8(2):285–300.
  9. Larsen, Erik G., David Cutts, and Matthew J. Goodwin. 2020. “Do Terrorist Attacks Feed Populist Eurosceptics? Evidence from Two Comparative Quasi-experiments.” European Journal of Political Research 59(1):182-205.
  10. Mikulaschek, Cristhoph, Saurabh Pant, and Beza Tesfaye. 2020. Winning Hearts and Minds in Civil Wars: Governance, Leadership Change, and Support for Violent Groups in Iraq.” American Journal of Political Sciences 64(4):773–790.
  11. Nägel, Christof, and Mark Lutter. 2020. The Christmas Market Attack in Berlin and Attitudes Toward Refugees: a Natural Experiment With Data from the European Social Survey.” European Journal of Security Research 5:199–221.
  12. Nussio, Enzo. 2020. “Attitudinal and Emotional Consequences of Islamist Terrorism. Evidence from the Berlin Attack.” Political Psychology 41(6):1151–1171.
  13. Raskin, Yoav, and Tal Sadeh. 2020. “Doomed to Alienate? How European Integration Feeds Euroscepticism.” https://www.peio.me/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/PEIO13_paper_40_1.pdf.
  14. Van Hauawaert, Steven M., and Robert A. Huber. 2020. “In-group Solidarity or Out-group Hostility in Response to Terrorism in France? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design.” European Journal of Political Research 59(4):936–953.
  15. Schraff, Dominik. 2020. “Political Trust During the Covid-19 Pandemic: Rally Around the Flag or Lockdown Effects?” SocArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/pu47c.
  16. Schwartz, Cassilde, Miranda Simon, David Hudson, and Jennifer van-Heerde-Hudson. 2020. “A Populist Paradox? How Brexit Softened Anti-immigrant Attitudes.” British Journal of Political Science:1-21.
  17. Wicki, Michael. 2020. “Ambitious Mobility Policies and Public Opinion: Doomed to Fail?” PhD diss. ETH Zurich.
Studies published in 2019
  1. Bruinsma, Bastiaan, Kostas Geminis, and Micha Germann. 2019. “The Electoral Effects of a Diplomatic Stand-off: Evidence From a Natural Experiment.” European Consortium of Political Research General Conference 2019.
  2. Jakiela, Pamela, and Owen Ozier. 2019. “The Impact of Violence on Individual Risk Preferences: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.“ The Review of Economics and Statistics 101(3): 547-559.
  3. Kim, Jin W., and Eunji Kim. 2019. “Identifying the Effect of Political Rumor Diffusion Using Variations in Survey Timing.” Quarterly Journal of Political Science 14(3):293-311.
  4. Marco, Giani, and Pierre-Guillaume Méon. 2019. “Global Racist Contagion Following Donald Trump’s Election.” British Journal of Political Science:1-8.
  5. Muñoz, Jordi and Eva Anduiza. 2019. “‘If a Fight Starts, Watch the Crowd’: The Effect of Violence on Popular Support for Social Movements.” Journal of Peace Research 56(4):485–498.
  6. Nussio, Enzo, Vincenzo Bove, and Bridget Steele. 2019. “The Consequences of Terrorism on Migration Attitudes Across Europe.” Political Geography 75:102047.
  7. Solaz, Hector, Catherine E. De Vries, and Roosmarijin A. de Geus. 2019. “In-Group Loyalty and the Punishment of Corruption.” Comparative Political Studies 52(6):896–926.
  8. Solodoch, Omer. 2019. “Regaining Control? The Political Impact of Policy Responses to Refugee Crises.” International Organization, Forthcoming.
Studies published in 2018
  1. Balcells, Laia, and Gerard Torrats-Espinosa. 2018. “Using a Natural Experiment to Estimate the Electoral Consequences of Terrorist Attacks.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(42):10624–10629.
  2. Boydstun, Amber E., Jessica T. Feezell, and Rebecca A. Glazier. 2018. “In the Wake of a Terrorist Attack, do Americans’ Attitudes Toward Muslims Decline?” Research & Politics 5(4):1–7.
  3. Burlacu, Diana, Ellen M. Immergut, Maria Oskarson, and Björn Rönnerstrand. 2018. “The Politics of Credit Claiming: Rights and Recognition in Health Policy Feedback.” Social Policy & Administration 52(4):880–894.
  4. Castanho Silva, Bruno. 2018. “The (Non)Impact of the 2015 Paris Terrorist Attacks on Political Attitudes.” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 44(6):838–850.
  5. De Vries, Catherine E. 2018. Euroscepticism and The future of European Integration. New York: Oxford University Press.
  6. Flores, René D. 2018. “Can Elites Shape Public Attitudes Toward Immigrants?: Evidence from the 2016 US Presidential Election.” Social Forces 96(4):1649–1690.
  7. Gorman, Brandon, and Charles Seguin. 2018. “World Citizens on the Periphery: Threat and Identification with Global Society.” American Journal of Sociology, 124(3):705-761.
  8. Hanaoka, Chie, Hitoshi Shigeoka, and Yasutora Watanabe. 2018.Do Risk Preferences Change? Evidence from the Great East Japan Earthquake.” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 10(2):298–330.
  9. Larsen, Erik G. 2018. “Welfare Retrenchments and Government Support: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” European Sociological Review 34(1):40–51.
  10. Minkus, Lara, Emanuel Deutschmann, and Jan Delhey. 2018. “A Trump Effect on the EU’s Popularity? The US Presidential Election as a Natural Experiment.” Perspectives on Politics 17(2):399–416.
  11. Valentim, Vicente. 2018. “Creating Critical Citizens? Anti-austerity Protests and Public Opinion.” Electoral Studies, forthcoming.
Studies published in 2017
  1. Ares, Macarena, and Enrique Hernández. 2017. “The Corrosive Effect of Corruption on Trust in Politicians: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” Research & Politics 4(2):1–8.
  2. Bassi, Vittorio, and Imran Rasul. 2017.Persuasion: A Case Study of Papal Influences on Fertility-related Beliefs and Behaviour.” American Economic Journal of Applied Economics 9(4):250–302.
  3. Coupe, Tom. 2017. “The Impact of Terrorism on Expectations, Trust and Happiness – the Case of the November 13 Attacks in Paris, France.” Applied Economics Letters 24(15):1084–1087.
  4. Geys, Benny, and Salmai Qari. 2017. “Will You Still Trust Me Tomorrow? The Causal Effect of Terrorism on Social Trust.” Public Choice 173(3-4):289–305.
  5. Schaffner, Brian F., and Cameron Roche. 2017. “Misinformation and Motivated Reasoning: Responses to Economic News in a Politicized Environment.” Public Opinion Quarterly 81(1):86-110.
Studies published in 2016
  1. Dinas, Elias, Erin Hartman, and Joost van Spanje. 2016. “Dead Man Walking: The Affective Roots of Issue Proximity Between Voters and Parties.” Political Behavior 38:659–687.
  2. Hariri, Jacob G., Christian Bjørnskov, and Mogens K. Justesen. 2016. “Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-being: Evidence from a Quasi-experiment.World Bank Economic Review 30(1):55–77.
  3. Jensen, Carsten, and Elias Naumann. 2016. “Increasing Pressures and Support for Public Healthcare in Europe.” Health Policy 120(6):698–705.
  4. Ojeda, Christopher. 2016. “The Effect of 9/11 on the Heritability of Political Trust.” Political Psychology 37(1):73–88.
  5. Pierce, Laman, Todd Rogers, and Jason A. Snyder. 2016. “Losing Hurts: The Happiness Impact of Partisan Electoral Loss.” Journal of Experimental Political Science 3(1):44–59.
  6. Reeves, Aaron, and de Robert Vries. 2016. “Does Media Coverage Influence Public Attitudes Towards Welfare Recipients? The Impact of the 2011 English Riots.” The British Journal of Sociology 67(2):281–306.
Studies published in 2015
  1. Branton, Regina, Valerie Martinez-Ebers, Tony E. Carey Jr., and Tetsuya Matsubayashi. 2015. “Social Protest and Policy Attitudes: The Case of the 2006 Immigrant Rallies.” American Journal of Political Science 59(2):390–402.
  2. García-Ponce, Omar, and Benjamin Pasquale. 2015. “How Political Repression Shapes Attitudes Toward the State: Evidence from Zimbabwe.” http://omargarciaponce.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/GarciaPonce_and_Pasquale_2014.pdf.
Studies published in 2014
  1. Carey Jr, Tony E., Regina P. Branton, and Valerie Martinez-Eber. 2014. “The Influence of Social Protests on Issue Salience Among Latinos.” Political Research Quarterly 67(3):615–627.
  2. Jakobsson, Niklas, and Svein Blom. 2014. “Did the 2011 Terror Attacks in Norway Change Citizens’ Attitudes Toward Immigrants?” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 26(4):475–486.
Studies published in 2013
  1. Bonilla, Tabitha, and Justin Grimmer. 2013. “Elevated Threat Levels and Decreased Expectations: How Democracy Handles Terrorist Threats.” Poetics 41(6):650–669.
  2. Dinesen, Peter T., and Mads M Jæger. 2013. “The Effect of Terror on Institutional Trust: New Evidence from the 3/11 Madrid Terrorist Attack.” Political Psychology 34(6):917–926.
  3. Finseraas, Henning, and Ola Listhaug. 2013. “It Can Happen Here: the Impact of the Mumbai Terror Attacks on Public Opinion in Western Europe.” Public Choice 156(1-2):213–228.
  4. Legewie, Joscha. 2013. “Terrorist Events and Attitudes Toward Immigrants: A Natural Experiment.” American Journal of Sociology 118(5):1199–1245.
  5. Silber Mohamed, Heather. 2013. “Can Protests Make Latinos “American”? Identity, Immigration Politics, and the 2006 Marches.” American Politics Research 41(2):298–327.
  6. Zepeda-Millán, Chris, and Sophia J. Wallace. 2013. “Racialization in Times of Contention: How Social Movements Influence Latino Racial Identity.” Politics, Groups, and Identities 1(4):510–527.
Studies published in 2012
  1. Holbrook, Thomas M., Clayton Clouse, and Aaron C. Weinschenk. 2012. “Bringing the President Back in: The Collapse of Lehman Brothers and the Evolution of Retrospective Voting in the 2008 Presidential Election.” Political Research Quarterly 65(2):263–274.
Studies published in 2011
  1. Bozzoli, Carlos, and Cathérine Müller. 2011. “Perceptions and Attitudes Following a Terrorist Shock: Evidence from the UK.” European Journal of Political Economy 27(S1):S89–S106.
  2. Finseraas, Henning, Niklas Jakobsson, and Andreas Kotsadam. 2011. “Did the Murder of Theo van Gogh Change Europeans’ Immigration Policy Preferences?” Kyklos 64(3):396–409.
  3. Metcalfe, Robert, Nattavudh Powdthavee, and Paul Dolan. 2011. “Destruction and Distress: Using a Quasi-experiment to Show the Effects of the September 11 Attacks on Mental Wellbeing in the United Kingdom.” The Economic Journal 121(550):F81–F103.
Studies published in 2010
  1. Berger, Eva M. 2010. “The Chernobyl Disaster, Concern About the Environment, and Life Satisfaction.” Kyklos 63(1):1–8.
  2. Slothuus, Rune. 2010. “When Can Political Parties Lead Public Opinion? Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” Political Communication 27(2):158–177.
Studies published before 2010
  1. Das, Enny et al. 2009. “How Terrorism News Reports Increase Prejudice Against Outgroups: A Terror Management Account.” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 45(3):453–459.
  2. Perrin, Andrew J., and Sondra J. Smolek. 2009. “Who Trusts? Race, Gender, and the September 11 Rally Effect Among Young Adults.” Social Science Research 38(1):134–145.
  3. Schulz, Peter J., Kent Nakamoto, Uwe Hartung, and Carmen Faustinelli. 2008. “The Death of Rosmarie Voser: The Not-so-harmful Consequences of a Fatal Medical Error.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 20(3):386–397.
  4. Boomgaarden, Hajo G., and Claes H. de Vreese. 2007. “Dramatic Real-world Events and Public Opinion Dynamics: Media Coverage and its Impact on Public Reactions to an Assassination.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 19(3):354–366.
  5. Nagoshi, Julie L., Heather K. Terrell, and Craig T. Nagoshi. 2007. “Changes in Authoritarianism and Coping in College Students Immediately After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001.” Personality and Individual Differences 43(7):1722–1732.
  6. Krosnick, Jon A., and Donald R. Kinder. 1990. “Altering the Foundations of Support for the President Through Priming.” American Political Science Review 84(2):497–512.
  7. Hofstetter, C. Richard. 1969. “Political Disengagement and the Death of Martin Luther King.” Public Opinion Quarterly 33(2):174–179.
  8. Lever, H. 1969. “The Johannesburg Station Explosion and Ethnic Attitudes.” Public Opinion Quarterly 33(2):180–189.
  9. Hartnett, Rodney T., and Carol U. Libby. 1968. Agreement With Views of Martin Luther King, Jr. Before and After his Assassination.“ ETS Research Bulletin Series, 1968(2):i–15.

 

 

 

Accidents, fatalities, disasters and epidemics
  1. Berger, Eva M. 2010. “The Chernobyl Disaster, Concern About the Environment, and Life Satisfaction.” Kyklos 63(1):1–8.
  2. Hanaoka, Chie, Hitoshi Shigeoka, and Yasutora Watanabe. 2018.Do Risk Preferences Change? Evidence from the Great East Japan Earthquake.” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 10(2):298–330.
  3. Jakiela, Pamela, and Owen Ozier. 2019. “The Impact of Violence on Individual Risk Preferences: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.“ The Review of Economics and Statistics 101(3): 547-559.
  4. Schraff, Dominik. 2020. “Political Trust During the Covid-19 Pandemic: Rally Around the Flag or Lockdown Effects?” SocArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/pu47c.
  5. Schulz, Peter J., Kent Nakamoto, Uwe Hartung, and Carmen Faustinelli. 2008. “The Death of Rosmarie Voser: The Not-so-harmful Consequences of a Fatal Medical Error.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 20(3):386–397.
  6. Wicki, Michael. 2020. “Ambitious Mobility Policies and Public Opinion: Doomed to Fail?” PhD diss. ETH Zurich.
Corruption
  1. Ares, Macarena, and Enrique Hernández. 2017. “The Corrosive Effect of Corruption on Trust in Politicians: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” Research & Politics 4(2):1–8.
  2. Ait Bihi Ouali, Laila. 2020. “Effects of Signalling Tax Evasion on Redistribution and Voting Preferences: Evidence from the Panama Papers.” PLoS ONE 15(3):e0229394.
  3. De Vries, Catherine E. 2018. Euroscepticism and The future of European Integration. New York: Oxford University Press.
  4. Krosnick, Jon A., and Donald R. Kinder. 1990. “Altering the Foundations of Support for the President Through Priming.” American Political Science Review 84(2):497–512.
  5. Solaz, Hector, Catherine E. De Vries, and Roosmarijin A. de Geus. 2019. “In-Group Loyalty and the Punishment of Corruption.” Comparative Political Studies 52(6):896–926.
Economic Shocks
  1. Hariri, Jacob G., Christian Bjørnskov, and Mogens K. Justesen. 2016. “Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-being: Evidence from a Quasi-experiment.World Bank Economic Review 30(1):55–77.
  2. Holbrook, Thomas M., Clayton Clouse, and Aaron C. Weinschenk. 2012. “Bringing the President Back in: The Collapse of Lehman Brothers and the Evolution of Retrospective Voting in the 2008 Presidential Election.” Political Research Quarterly 65(2):263–274.
  3. Schaffner, Brian F., and Cameron Roche. 2017. “Misinformation and Motivated Reasoning: Responses to Economic News in a Politicized Environment.” Public Opinion Quarterly 81(1):86-110.
Elections Results
  1. Brugarolas, Pablo, and Luis Miller. 2021. “The Causal Effect of Polls on Turnout Intention: A Local Randomization Regression Discontinuity Approach.” Political Analysis, forthcoming.
  2. Marco, Giani, and Pierre-Guillaume Méon. 2019. “Global Racist Contagion Following Donald Trump’s Election.” British Journal of Political Science:1-8.
  3. Minkus, Lara, Emanuel Deutschmann, and Jan Delhey. 2018. “A Trump Effect on the EU’s Popularity? The US Presidential Election as a Natural Experiment.” Perspectives on Politics 17(2):399–416.
  4. Pierce, Laman, Todd Rogers, and Jason A. Snyder. 2016. “Losing Hurts: The Happiness Impact of Partisan Electoral Loss.” Journal of Experimental Political Science 3(1):44–59.
  5. Schwartz, Cassilde, Miranda Simon, David Hudson, and Jennifer van-Heerde-Hudson. 2020. “A Populist Paradox? How Brexit Softened Anti-immigrant Attitudes.” British Journal of Political Science:1-21.
  6. Turnbull-Dugarte, Stuart J, and José Rama. 2021. “When the US Far-right Sneezes, the European Far-right Catches a Cold. Quasi-experimental of Electoral Contagion from Spain.” OSF Preprints. https://doi.org/10.31219/osf.io/s6fmj.
Policies and political and judicial decisions
  1. Bol, Damien, Marco Giani, André Blais, and Peter J. Loewen. 2021. “The Effect of COVID‐19 Lockdowns on Political Support: Some Good News for Democracy?” European Journal of Political Research 60(2):497–505.
  2. Bridgman, Aengus, Costin Ciobanu, Aaron Erlich, Danielle Bohonos, and Christopher Ross. 2020. “Unveiling: the Electoral Consequences of an Exogenous Mid-campaign Court Ruling.” The Journal of Politics, forthcoming.
  3. Bruinsma, Bastiaan, Kostas Geminis, and Micha Germann. 2019. “The Electoral Effects of a Diplomatic Stand-off: Evidence From a Natural Experiment.” European Consortium of Political Research General Conference 2019.
  4. Burlacu, Diana, Ellen M. Immergut, Maria Oskarson, and Björn Rönnerstrand. 2018. “The Politics of Credit Claiming: Rights and Recognition in Health Policy Feedback.” Social Policy & Administration 52(4):880–894.
  5. Casas, Agustín, Federico Curci, and Antoni-Italo De Moragas. 2020. “Checks and Balances and Nation Building: The Spanish Constitutional Court and Catalonia.” SIOE Conference: 2020.
  6. De Vries, Catherine E., Bert N. Bakker, Sara Hobolt, and Kevin Arceneaux. 2020. “Crisis Signaling: How Italy’s Coronavirus Lockdown Affected Incumbent Support in Other European Countries.” SSRN. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3606149.
  7. Falcó-Gimeno, Albert, and Pablo Fernandez-Vazquez. 2020. “Choices That Matter: Coalition Formation and Parties’ Ideological Reputations.” Political Science Research and Methods 8(2):285–300.
  8. Larsen, Erik G. 2018. “Welfare Retrenchments and Government Support: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” European Sociological Review 34(1):40–51.
  9. Merler, Silvia. 2021. “Technocracy, Trust and Democracy: Evidence on Citizens’ Attitudes from a Natural Experiment in Italy.” Government and Opposition 56(2):301–325.
  10. Mikulaschek, Cristhoph, Saurabh Pant, and Beza Tesfaye. 2020. Winning Hearts and Minds in Civil Wars: Governance, Leadership Change, and Support for Violent Groups in Iraq.” American Journal of Political Sciences 64(4):773–790.
  11. Raskin, Yoav, and Tal Sadeh. 2020. “Doomed to Alienate? How European Integration Feeds Euroscepticism.” https://www.peio.me/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/PEIO13_paper_40_1.pdf.
  12. Slothuus, Rune. 2010. “When Can Political Parties Lead Public Opinion? Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” Political Communication 27(2):158–177.
  13. Solodoch, Omer. 2019. “Regaining Control? The Political Impact of Policy Responses to Refugee Crises.” International Organization, Forthcoming.
Protests and Repression
  1. Branton, Regina, Valerie Martinez-Ebers, Tony E. Carey Jr., and Tetsuya Matsubayashi. 2015. “Social Protest and Policy Attitudes: The Case of the 2006 Immigrant Rallies.” American Journal of Political Science 59(2):390–402.
  2. Carey Jr, Tony E., Regina P. Branton, and Valerie Martinez-Eber. 2014. “The Influence of Social Protests on Issue Salience Among Latinos.” Political Research Quarterly 67(3):615–627.
  3. Curtice, Travis. 2021. “How Repression A ffects Public Perceptions of Police: Evidence from Uganda.” Journal of Conflict Resolution, forthcoming.
  4. García-Ponce, Omar, and Benjamin Pasquale. 2015. “How Political Repression Shapes Attitudes Toward the State: Evidence from Zimbabwe.” http://omargarciaponce.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/GarciaPonce_and_Pasquale_2014.pdf.
  5. Muñoz, Jordi and Eva Anduiza. 2019. “‘If a Fight Starts, Watch the Crowd’: The Effect of Violence on Popular Support for Social Movements.” Journal of Peace Research 56(4):485–498.
  6. Reeves, Aaron, and de Robert Vries. 2016. “Does Media Coverage Influence Public Attitudes Towards Welfare Recipients? The Impact of the 2011 English Riots.” The British Journal of Sociology 67(2):281–306.
  7. Silber Mohamed, Heather. 2013. “Can Protests Make Latinos “American”? Identity, Immigration Politics, and the 2006 Marches.” American Politics Research 41(2):298–327.
  8. Valentim, Vicente. 2018. “Creating Critical Citizens? Anti-austerity Protests and Public Opinion.” Electoral Studies, forthcoming.
  9. Zepeda-Millán, Chris, and Sophia J. Wallace. 2013. “Racialization in Times of Contention: How Social Movements Influence Latino Racial Identity.” Politics, Groups, and Identities 1(4):510–527.
Sports
  1. Depetris-Chauvin, Emilio, Ruben Durante, and Felipe R. Campante. 2020. “Building Nations Through Shared Experiences: Evidence from African Football.” American Economic Review 110(5):1572–1602.
  2. Müller, Stefan, and Liam Kneafsey. 2021. “Evidence for the Irrelevance of Irrelevant Events.” https://muellerstefan.net/papers/mueller_kneafsey_irrelevance_irrelevant_events.pdf.
Statement and Rumors
  1. Bassi, Vittorio, and Imran Rasul. 2017.Persuasion: A Case Study of Papal Influences on Fertility-related Beliefs and Behaviour.” American Economic Journal of Applied Economics 9(4):250–302.
  2. Flores, René D. 2018. “Can Elites Shape Public Attitudes Toward Immigrants?: Evidence from the 2016 US Presidential Election.” Social Forces 96(4):1649–1690.
  3. Kim, Jin W., and Eunji Kim. 2019. “Identifying the Effect of Political Rumor Diffusion Using Variations in Survey Timing.” Quarterly Journal of Political Science 14(3):293-311.
Terrorism
  1. Balcells, Laia, and Gerard Torrats-Espinosa. 2018. “Using a Natural Experiment to Estimate the Electoral Consequences of Terrorist Attacks.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(42):10624–10629.
  2. Belmonte, Alessandro. 2020. “Inter-ethnic Dynamics in the Wake of Terrorist Attacks: Evidence from the 2015 Baga Massacre.” Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy. https://doi.org/10.1515/peps-2020-0009.
  3. Bonilla, Tabitha, and Justin Grimmer. 2013. “Elevated Threat Levels and Decreased Expectations: How Democracy Handles Terrorist Threats.” Poetics 41(6):650–669.
  4. Boomgaarden, Hajo G., and Claes H. de Vreese. 2007. “Dramatic Real-world Events and Public Opinion Dynamics: Media Coverage and its Impact on Public Reactions to an Assassination.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 19(3):354–366.
  5. Boydstun, Amber E., Jessica T. Feezell, and Rebecca A. Glazier. 2018. “In the Wake of a Terrorist Attack, do Americans’ Attitudes Toward Muslims Decline?” Research & Politics 5(4):1–7.
  6. Bozzoli, Carlos, and Cathérine Müller. 2011. “Perceptions and Attitudes Following a Terrorist Shock: Evidence from the UK.” European Journal of Political Economy 27(S1):S89–S106.
  7. Castanho Silva, Bruno. 2018. “The (Non)Impact of the 2015 Paris Terrorist Attacks on Political Attitudes.” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 44(6):838–850.
  8. Coupe, Tom. 2017. “The Impact of Terrorism on Expectations, Trust and Happiness – the Case of the November 13 Attacks in Paris, France.” Applied Economics Letters 24(15):1084–1087.
  9. Das, Enny et al. 2009. “How Terrorism News Reports Increase Prejudice Against Outgroups: A Terror Management Account.” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 45(3):453–459.
  10. Dinas, Elias, Erin Hartman, and Joost van Spanje. 2016. “Dead Man Walking: The Affective Roots of Issue Proximity Between Voters and Parties.” Political Behavior 38:659–687.
  11. Dinesen, Peter T., and Mads M Jæger. 2013. “The Effect of Terror on Institutional Trust: New Evidence from the 3/11 Madrid Terrorist Attack.” Political Psychology 34(6):917–926.
  12. Ferrín, Mónica, Moreno Mancosu, and Teresa M. Cappiali. 2020. “Terrorist Attacks and Europeans’ Attitudes Towards Immigrants: An Experimental Approach.” European Journal of Political Research 59(3):491–516.
  13. Finseraas, Henning, and Ola Listhaug. 2013. “It Can Happen Here: the Impact of the Mumbai Terror Attacks on Public Opinion in Western Europe.” Public Choice 156(1-2):213–228.
  14. Finseraas, Henning, Niklas Jakobsson, and Andreas Kotsadam. 2011. “Did the Murder of Theo van Gogh Change Europeans’ Immigration Policy Preferences?” Kyklos 64(3):396–409.
  15. Geys, Benny, and Salmai Qari. 2017. “Will You Still Trust Me Tomorrow? The Causal Effect of Terrorism on Social Trust.” Public Choice 173(3-4):289–305.
  16. Giani, Marco. 2021. “Fear Without Prejudice in the Shadow of Jihadist Threat.” Comparative Political Studies 54(6):1058–1085.
  17. Gorman, Brandon, and Charles Seguin. 2018. “World Citizens on the Periphery: Threat and Identification with Global Society.” American Journal of Sociology, 124(3):705-761.
  18. Hartnett, Rodney T., and Carol U. Libby. 1968. Agreement With Views of Martin Luther King, Jr. Before and After his Assassination.“ ETS Research Bulletin Series, 1968(2):i–15.
  19. Hofstetter, C. Richard. 1969. “Political Disengagement and the Death of Martin Luther King.” Public Opinion Quarterly 33(2):174–179.
  20. Jakobsson, Niklas, and Svein Blom. 2014. “Did the 2011 Terror Attacks in Norway Change Citizens’ Attitudes Toward Immigrants?” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 26(4):475–486.
  21. Larsen, Erik G., David Cutts, and Matthew J. Goodwin. 2020. “Do Terrorist Attacks Feed Populist Eurosceptics? Evidence from Two Comparative Quasi-experiments.” European Journal of Political Research 59(1):182-205.
  22. Legewie, Joscha. 2013. “Terrorist Events and Attitudes Toward Immigrants: A Natural Experiment.” American Journal of Sociology 118(5):1199–1245.
  23. Lever, H. 1969. “The Johannesburg Station Explosion and Ethnic Attitudes.” Public Opinion Quarterly 33(2):180–189.
  24. Metcalfe, Robert, Nattavudh Powdthavee, and Paul Dolan. 2011. “Destruction and Distress: Using a Quasi-experiment to Show the Effects of the September 11 Attacks on Mental Wellbeing in the United Kingdom.” The Economic Journal 121(550):F81–F103.
  25. Nägel, Christof, and Mark Lutter. 2020. The Christmas Market Attack in Berlin and Attitudes Toward Refugees: a Natural Experiment With Data from the European Social Survey.” European Journal of Security Research 5:199–221.
  26. Nagoshi, Julie L., Heather K. Terrell, and Craig T. Nagoshi. 2007. “Changes in Authoritarianism and Coping in College Students Immediately After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001.” Personality and Individual Differences 43(7):1722–1732.
  27. Nussio, Enzo. 2020. “Attitudinal and Emotional Consequences of Islamist Terrorism. Evidence from the Berlin Attack.” Political Psychology 41(6):1151–1171.
  28. Nussio, Enzo, Vincenzo Bove, and Bridget Steele. 2019. “The Consequences of Terrorism on Migration Attitudes Across Europe.” Political Geography 75:102047.
  29. Ojeda, Christopher. 2016. “The Effect of 9/11 on the Heritability of Political Trust.” Political Psychology 37(1):73–88.
  30. Perrin, Andrew J., and Sondra J. Smolek. 2009. “Who Trusts? Race, Gender, and the September 11 Rally Effect Among Young Adults.” Social Science Research 38(1):134–145.
  31. Van Hauawaert, Steven M., and Robert A. Huber. 2020. “In-group Solidarity or Out-group Hostility in Response to Terrorism in France? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design.” European Journal of Political Research 59(4):936–953.
Others
  1. Jensen, Carsten, and Elias Naumann. 2016. “Increasing Pressures and Support for Public Healthcare in Europe.” Health Policy 120(6):698–705.

 

 

 

Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups and other out-groups
  1. Belmonte, Alessandro. 2020. “Inter-ethnic Dynamics in the Wake of Terrorist Attacks: Evidence from the 2015 Baga Massacre.” Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy. https://doi.org/10.1515/peps-2020-0009.
  2. Boomgaarden, Hajo G., and Claes H. de Vreese. 2007. “Dramatic Real-world Events and Public Opinion Dynamics: Media Coverage and its Impact on Public Reactions to an Assassination.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 19(3):354–366.
  3. Boydstun, Amber E., Jessica T. Feezell, and Rebecca A. Glazier. 2018. “In the Wake of a Terrorist Attack, do Americans’ Attitudes Toward Muslims Decline?” Research & Politics 5(4):1–7.
  4. Branton, Regina, Valerie Martinez-Ebers, Tony E. Carey Jr., and Tetsuya Matsubayashi. 2015. “Social Protest and Policy Attitudes: The Case of the 2006 Immigrant Rallies.” American Journal of Political Science 59(2):390–402.
  5. Carey Jr, Tony E., Regina P. Branton, and Valerie Martinez-Eber. 2014. “The Influence of Social Protests on Issue Salience Among Latinos.” Political Research Quarterly 67(3):615–627.
  6. Castanho Silva, Bruno. 2018. “The (Non)Impact of the 2015 Paris Terrorist Attacks on Political Attitudes.” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 44(6):838–850.
  7. Das, Enny et al. 2009. “How Terrorism News Reports Increase Prejudice Against Outgroups: A Terror Management Account.” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 45(3):453–459.
  8. Depetris-Chauvin, Emilio, Ruben Durante, and Felipe R. Campante. 2020. “Building Nations Through Shared Experiences: Evidence from African Football.” American Economic Review 110(5):1572–1602.
  9. Ferrín, Mónica, Moreno Mancosu, and Teresa M. Cappiali. 2020. “Terrorist Attacks and Europeans’ Attitudes Towards Immigrants: An Experimental Approach.” European Journal of Political Research 59(3):491–516.
  10. Finseraas, Henning, Niklas Jakobsson, and Andreas Kotsadam. 2011. “Did the Murder of Theo van Gogh Change Europeans’ Immigration Policy Preferences?” Kyklos 64(3):396–409.
  11. Flores, René D. 2018. “Can Elites Shape Public Attitudes Toward Immigrants?: Evidence from the 2016 US Presidential Election.” Social Forces 96(4):1649–1690.
  12. Giani, Marco. 2021. “Fear Without Prejudice in the Shadow of Jihadist Threat.” Comparative Political Studies 54(6):1058–1085.
  13. Jakobsson, Niklas, and Svein Blom. 2014. “Did the 2011 Terror Attacks in Norway Change Citizens’ Attitudes Toward Immigrants?” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 26(4):475–486.
  14. Larsen, Erik G., David Cutts, and Matthew J. Goodwin. 2020. “Do Terrorist Attacks Feed Populist Eurosceptics? Evidence from Two Comparative Quasi-experiments.” European Journal of Political Research 59(1):182-205.
  15. Legewie, Joscha. 2013. “Terrorist Events and Attitudes Toward Immigrants: A Natural Experiment.” American Journal of Sociology 118(5):1199–1245.
  16. Lever, H. 1969. “The Johannesburg Station Explosion and Ethnic Attitudes.” Public Opinion Quarterly 33(2):180–189.
  17. Marco, Giani, and Pierre-Guillaume Méon. 2019. “Global Racist Contagion Following Donald Trump’s Election.” British Journal of Political Science:1-8.
  18. Nägel, Christof, and Mark Lutter. 2020. The Christmas Market Attack in Berlin and Attitudes Toward Refugees: a Natural Experiment With Data from the European Social Survey.” European Journal of Security Research 5:199–221.
  19. Nussio, Enzo. 2020. “Attitudinal and Emotional Consequences of Islamist Terrorism. Evidence from the Berlin Attack.” Political Psychology 41(6):1151–1171.
  20. Nussio, Enzo, Vincenzo Bove, and Bridget Steele. 2019. “The Consequences of Terrorism on Migration Attitudes Across Europe.” Political Geography 75:102047.
  21. Reeves, Aaron, and de Robert Vries. 2016. “Does Media Coverage Influence Public Attitudes Towards Welfare Recipients? The Impact of the 2011 English Riots.” The British Journal of Sociology 67(2):281–306.
  22. Schwartz, Cassilde, Miranda Simon, David Hudson, and Jennifer van-Heerde-Hudson. 2020. “A Populist Paradox? How Brexit Softened Anti-immigrant Attitudes.” British Journal of Political Science:1-21.
  23. Silber Mohamed, Heather. 2013. “Can Protests Make Latinos “American”? Identity, Immigration Politics, and the 2006 Marches.” American Politics Research 41(2):298–327.
  24. Solodoch, Omer. 2019. “Regaining Control? The Political Impact of Policy Responses to Refugee Crises.” International Organization, Forthcoming.
  25. Van Hauawaert, Steven M., and Robert A. Huber. 2020. “In-group Solidarity or Out-group Hostility in Response to Terrorism in France? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design.” European Journal of Political Research 59(4):936–953.
  26. Zepeda-Millán, Chris, and Sophia J. Wallace. 2013. “Racialization in Times of Contention: How Social Movements Influence Latino Racial Identity.” Politics, Groups, and Identities 1(4):510–527.
Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties
  1. Ait Bihi Ouali, Laila. 2020. “Effects of Signalling Tax Evasion on Redistribution and Voting Preferences: Evidence from the Panama Papers.” PLoS ONE 15(3):e0229394.
  2. Ares, Macarena, and Enrique Hernández. 2017. “The Corrosive Effect of Corruption on Trust in Politicians: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” Research & Politics 4(2):1–8.
  3. Balcells, Laia, and Gerard Torrats-Espinosa. 2018. “Using a Natural Experiment to Estimate the Electoral Consequences of Terrorist Attacks.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(42):10624–10629.
  4. Bol, Damien, Marco Giani, André Blais, and Peter J. Loewen. 2021. “The Effect of COVID‐19 Lockdowns on Political Support: Some Good News for Democracy?” European Journal of Political Research 60(2):497–505.
  5. Bridgman, Aengus, Costin Ciobanu, Aaron Erlich, Danielle Bohonos, and Christopher Ross. 2020. “Unveiling: the Electoral Consequences of an Exogenous Mid-campaign Court Ruling.” The Journal of Politics, forthcoming
  6. Bruinsma, Bastiaan, Kostas Geminis, and Micha Germann. 2019. “The Electoral Effects of a Diplomatic Stand-off: Evidence From a Natural Experiment.” European Consortium of Political Research General Conference 2019.
  7. Brugarolas, Pablo, and Luis Miller. 2021. “The Causal Effect of Polls on Turnout Intention: A Local Randomization Regression Discontinuity Approach.” Political Analysis, forthcoming.
  8. Burlacu, Diana, Ellen M. Immergut, Maria Oskarson, and Björn Rönnerstrand. 2018. “The Politics of Credit Claiming: Rights and Recognition in Health Policy Feedback.” Social Policy & Administration 52(4):880–894.
  9. Casas, Agustín, Federico Curci, and Antoni-Italo De Moragas. 2020. “Checks and Balances and Nation Building: The Spanish Constitutional Court and Catalonia.” SIOE Conference: 2020.
  10. Coupe, Tom. 2017. “The Impact of Terrorism on Expectations, Trust and Happiness – the Case of the November 13 Attacks in Paris, France.” Applied Economics Letters 24(15):1084–1087.
  11. Curtice, Travis. 2021. “How Repression A ffects Public Perceptions of Police: Evidence from Uganda.” Journal of Conflict Resolution, forthcoming.
  12. De Vries, Catherine E. 2018. Euroscepticism and The future of European Integration. New York: Oxford University Press.
  13. De Vries, Catherine E., Bert N. Bakker, Sara Hobolt, and Kevin Arceneaux. 2020. “Crisis Signaling: How Italy’s Coronavirus Lockdown Affected Incumbent Support in Other European Countries.” SSRN. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3606149.
  14. Dinas, Elias, Erin Hartman, and Joost van Spanje. 2016. “Dead Man Walking: The Affective Roots of Issue Proximity Between Voters and Parties.” Political Behavior 38:659–687.
  15. Dinesen, Peter T., and Mads M Jæger. 2013. “The Effect of Terror on Institutional Trust: New Evidence from the 3/11 Madrid Terrorist Attack.” Political Psychology 34(6):917–926.
  16. Falcó-Gimeno, Albert, and Pablo Fernandez-Vazquez. 2020. “Choices That Matter: Coalition Formation and Parties’ Ideological Reputations.” Political Science Research and Methods 8(2):285–300.
  17. García-Ponce, Omar, and Benjamin Pasquale. 2015. “How Political Repression Shapes Attitudes Toward the State: Evidence from Zimbabwe.” http://omargarciaponce.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/GarciaPonce_and_Pasquale_2014.pdf.
  18. Hartnett, Rodney T., and Carol U. Libby. 1968. Agreement With Views of Martin Luther King, Jr. Before and After his Assassination.“ ETS Research Bulletin Series, 1968(2):i–15.
  19. Hofstetter, C. Richard. 1969. “Political Disengagement and the Death of Martin Luther King.” Public Opinion Quarterly 33(2):174–179.
  20. Holbrook, Thomas M., Clayton Clouse, and Aaron C. Weinschenk. 2012. “Bringing the President Back in: The Collapse of Lehman Brothers and the Evolution of Retrospective Voting in the 2008 Presidential Election.” Political Research Quarterly 65(2):263–274.
  21. Jensen, Carsten, and Elias Naumann. 2016. “Increasing Pressures and Support for Public Healthcare in Europe.” Health Policy 120(6):698–705.
  22. Krosnick, Jon A., and Donald R. Kinder. 1990. “Altering the Foundations of Support for the President Through Priming.” American Political Science Review 84(2):497–512.
  23. Larsen, Erik G. 2018. “Welfare Retrenchments and Government Support: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” European Sociological Review 34(1):40–51.
  24. Larsen, Erik G., David Cutts, and Matthew J. Goodwin. 2020. “Do Terrorist Attacks Feed Populist Eurosceptics? Evidence from Two Comparative Quasi-experiments.” European Journal of Political Research 59(1):182-205.
  25. Merler, Silvia. 2021. “Technocracy, Trust and Democracy: Evidence on Citizens’ Attitudes from a Natural Experiment in Italy.” Government and Opposition 56(2):301–325.
  26. Mikulaschek, Cristhoph, Saurabh Pant, and Beza Tesfaye. 2020. Winning Hearts and Minds in Civil Wars: Governance, Leadership Change, and Support for Violent Groups in Iraq.” American Journal of Political Sciences 64(4):773–790.
  27. Minkus, Lara, Emanuel Deutschmann, and Jan Delhey. 2018. “A Trump Effect on the EU’s Popularity? The US Presidential Election as a Natural Experiment.” Perspectives on Politics 17(2):399–416.
  28. Müller, Stefan, and Liam Kneafsey. 2021. “Evidence for the Irrelevance of Irrelevant Events.” https://muellerstefan.net/papers/mueller_kneafsey_irrelevance_irrelevant_events.pdf.
  29. Nussio, Enzo. 2020. “Attitudinal and Emotional Consequences of Islamist Terrorism. Evidence from the Berlin Attack.” Political Psychology 41(6):1151–1171.
  30. Ojeda, Christopher. 2016. “The Effect of 9/11 on the Heritability of Political Trust.” Political Psychology 37(1):73–88.
  31. Perrin, Andrew J., and Sondra J. Smolek. 2009. “Who Trusts? Race, Gender, and the September 11 Rally Effect Among Young Adults.” Social Science Research 38(1):134–145.
  32. Raskin, Yoav, and Tal Sadeh. 2020. “Doomed to Alienate? How European Integration Feeds Euroscepticism.” https://www.peio.me/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/PEIO13_paper_40_1.pdf.
  33. Schraff, Dominik. 2020. “Political Trust During the Covid-19 Pandemic: Rally Around the Flag or Lockdown Effects?” SocArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/pu47c.
  34. Solaz, Hector, Catherine E. De Vries, and Roosmarijin A. de Geus. 2019. “In-Group Loyalty and the Punishment of Corruption.” Comparative Political Studies 52(6):896–926.
  35. Turnbull-Dugarte, Stuart J, and José Rama. 2021. “When the US Far-right Sneezes, the European Far-right Catches a Cold. Quasi-experimental of Electoral Contagion from Spain.” OSF Preprints. https://doi.org/10.31219/osf.io/s6fmj.
  36. Valentim, Vicente. 2018. “Creating Critical Citizens? Anti-austerity Protests and Public Opinion.” Electoral Studies, forthcoming.
Emotions and well-being
  1. Berger, Eva M. 2010. “The Chernobyl Disaster, Concern About the Environment, and Life Satisfaction.” Kyklos 63(1):1–8.
  2. Coupe, Tom. 2017. “The Impact of Terrorism on Expectations, Trust and Happiness – the Case of the November 13 Attacks in Paris, France.” Applied Economics Letters 24(15):1084–1087.
  3. Hariri, Jacob G., Christian Bjørnskov, and Mogens K. Justesen. 2016. “Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-being: Evidence from a Quasi-experiment.World Bank Economic Review 30(1):55–77.
  4. Metcalfe, Robert, Nattavudh Powdthavee, and Paul Dolan. 2011. “Destruction and Distress: Using a Quasi-experiment to Show the Effects of the September 11 Attacks on Mental Wellbeing in the United Kingdom.” The Economic Journal 121(550):F81–F103.
  5. Nagoshi, Julie L., Heather K. Terrell, and Craig T. Nagoshi. 2007. “Changes in Authoritarianism and Coping in College Students Immediately After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001.” Personality and Individual Differences 43(7):1722–1732.
  6. Nussio, Enzo. 2020. “Attitudinal and Emotional Consequences of Islamist Terrorism. Evidence from the Berlin Attack.” Political Psychology 41(6):1151–1171.
  7. Pierce, Laman, Todd Rogers, and Jason A. Snyder. 2016. “Losing Hurts: The Happiness Impact of Partisan Electoral Loss.” Journal of Experimental Political Science 3(1):44–59.
Other attitudes and beliefs
  1. Bassi, Vittorio, and Imran Rasul. 2017.Persuasion: A Case Study of Papal Influences on Fertility-related Beliefs and Behaviour.” American Economic Journal of Applied Economics 9(4):250–302.
  2. Berger, Eva M. 2010. “The Chernobyl Disaster, Concern About the Environment, and Life Satisfaction.” Kyklos 63(1):1–8.
  3. Bonilla, Tabitha, and Justin Grimmer. 2013. “Elevated Threat Levels and Decreased Expectations: How Democracy Handles Terrorist Threats.” Poetics 41(6):650–669.
  4. Bozzoli, Carlos, and Cathérine Müller. 2011. “Perceptions and Attitudes Following a Terrorist Shock: Evidence from the UK.” European Journal of Political Economy 27(S1):S89–S106.
  5. Castanho Silva, Bruno. 2018. “The (Non)Impact of the 2015 Paris Terrorist Attacks on Political Attitudes.” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 44(6):838–850.
  6. Coupe, Tom. 2017. “The Impact of Terrorism on Expectations, Trust and Happiness – the Case of the November 13 Attacks in Paris, France.” Applied Economics Letters 24(15):1084–1087.
  7. Finseraas, Henning, and Ola Listhaug. 2013. “It Can Happen Here: the Impact of the Mumbai Terror Attacks on Public Opinion in Western Europe.” Public Choice 156(1-2):213–228.
  8. Geys, Benny, and Salmai Qari. 2017. “Will You Still Trust Me Tomorrow? The Causal Effect of Terrorism on Social Trust.” Public Choice 173(3-4):289–305.
  9. Gorman, Brandon, and Charles Seguin. 2018. “World Citizens on the Periphery: Threat and Identification with Global Society.” American Journal of Sociology, 124(3):705-761.
  10. Hanaoka, Chie, Hitoshi Shigeoka, and Yasutora Watanabe. 2018.Do Risk Preferences Change? Evidence from the Great East Japan Earthquake.” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 10(2):298–330.
  11. Jakiela, Pamela, and Owen Ozier. 2019. “The Impact of Violence on Individual Risk Preferences: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.“ The Review of Economics and Statistics 101(3): 547-559.
  12. Kim, Jin W., and Eunji Kim. 2019. “Identifying the Effect of Political Rumor Diffusion Using Variations in Survey Timing.” Quarterly Journal of Political Science 14(3):293-311.
  13. Muñoz, Jordi and Eva Anduiza. 2019. “‘If a Fight Starts, Watch the Crowd’: The Effect of Violence on Popular Support for Social Movements.” Journal of Peace Research 56(4):485–498.
  14. Nagoshi, Julie L., Heather K. Terrell, and Craig T. Nagoshi. 2007. “Changes in Authoritarianism and Coping in College Students Immediately After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001.” Personality and Individual Differences 43(7):1722–1732.
  15. Schaffner, Brian F., and Cameron Roche. 2017. “Misinformation and Motivated Reasoning: Responses to Economic News in a Politicized Environment.” Public Opinion Quarterly 81(1):86-110.
  16. Schulz, Peter J., Kent Nakamoto, Uwe Hartung, and Carmen Faustinelli. 2008. “The Death of Rosmarie Voser: The Not-so-harmful Consequences of a Fatal Medical Error.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 20(3):386–397.
  17. Wicki, Michael. 2020. “Ambitious Mobility Policies and Public Opinion: Doomed to Fail?” PhD diss. ETH Zurich.
Policy preferences
  1. Ait Bihi Ouali, Laila. 2020. “Effects of Signalling Tax Evasion on Redistribution and Voting Preferences: Evidence from the Panama Papers.” PLoS ONE 15(3):e0229394.
  2. Bonilla, Tabitha, and Justin Grimmer. 2013. “Elevated Threat Levels and Decreased Expectations: How Democracy Handles Terrorist Threats.” Poetics 41(6):650–669.
  3. Bozzoli, Carlos, and Cathérine Müller. 2011. “Perceptions and Attitudes Following a Terrorist Shock: Evidence from the UK.” European Journal of Political Economy 27(S1):S89–S106.
  4. Branton, Regina, Valerie Martinez-Ebers, Tony E. Carey Jr., and Tetsuya Matsubayashi. 2015. “Social Protest and Policy Attitudes: The Case of the 2006 Immigrant Rallies.” American Journal of Political Science 59(2):390–402.
  5. Burlacu, Diana, Ellen M. Immergut, Maria Oskarson, and Björn Rönnerstrand. 2018. “The Politics of Credit Claiming: Rights and Recognition in Health Policy Feedback.” Social Policy & Administration 52(4):880–894.
  6. Finseraas, Henning, and Ola Listhaug. 2013. “It Can Happen Here: the Impact of the Mumbai Terror Attacks on Public Opinion in Western Europe.” Public Choice 156(1-2):213–228.
  7. Slothuus, Rune. 2010. “When Can Political Parties Lead Public Opinion? Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” Political Communication 27(2):158–177.

 

 

 

Ait Bihi Ouali, Laila. 2020. “Effects of Signalling Tax Evasion on Redistribution and Voting Preferences: Evidence from the Panama Papers.” PLoS ONE 15(3):e0229394.

  • Event Information: Corruption. Chernobyl nuclear accident on 26 April 1986.
  • Outcome Information: Policy preferences. Attitudes toward redistribution and voting intentions.
  • Survey InformationEuropean Social Survey. 2014-2016.

Ares, Macarena, and Enrique Hernández. 2017. “The Corrosive Effect of Corruption on Trust in Politicians: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” Research & Politics 4(2):1–8.

  • Event Information: Corruption. “Bárcenas” corruption scandal in Spain in 2013.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Trust in politicians.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey. 2015 Spanish wave.

Balcells, Laia, and Gerard Torrats-Espinosa. 2018. “Using a Natural Experiment to Estimate the Electoral Consequences of Terrorist Attacks.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115(42):10624–10629.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. ETA terror attacks in Spain.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Participation and incumbent voting.
  • Survey Information: Surveys of the Spanish Centre for Sociological Research (Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas, Spain). 1836, 1873, 1967, 2130, 2131, 2152 and 2254.

Bassi, Vittorio, and Imran Rasul. 2017.Persuasion: A Case Study of Papal Influences on Fertility-related Beliefs and Behaviour.” American Economic Journal of Applied Economics 9(4):250–302.

  • Event Information: Statements and rumors. Papal visit to Brazil in October 1991.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Individual intentions to contracept.
  • Survey Information: Demographic and Health Survery. 1991.

Belmonte, Alessandro. 2020. “Inter-ethnic Dynamics in the Wake of Terrorist Attacks: Evidence from the 2015 Baga Massacre.” Peace Economics, Peace Science and Public Policy. https://doi.org/10.1515/peps-2020-0009.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Boko Haram 2015 massacre in Nigeria.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward ethnic groups.
  • Survey Information: Afrobarometer. 2014-2015.

Berger, Eva M. 2010. “The Chernobyl Disaster, Concern About the Environment, and Life Satisfaction.” Kyklos 63(1):1–8.

  • Event Information: Accidents, fatalities, disasters, and epidemics. 2016 Panama Papers Scandal.
  • Outcome Information: Emotions and well-being/Other attitudes and beliefs. Life satisfaction and concern for the environment.
  • Survey Information: German Socio-Economic Panel Study Innovation. 1984-1986.

Bol, Damien, Marco Giani, André Blais, and Peter J. Loewen. 2021. “The Effect of COVID‐19 Lockdowns on Political Support: Some Good News for Democracy?” European Journal of Political Research 60(2):497–505.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. COVID-19 lockdowns in Europe in March 2020.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Voting for the incumbent, trust in government, and satisfaction with democracy.
  • Survey Information: Research Survey. 2020.

Bonilla, Tabitha, and Justin Grimmer. 2013. “Elevated Threat Levels and Decreased Expectations: How Democracy Handles Terrorist Threats.” Poetics 41(6):650–669.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. US government elevation of terror alerts between 2002 and 2004.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs/Policy preferences. Perception of terror and attitudes toward incumbent and other policies.
  • Survey Information: Gallup (investor and adult); ABC-Washington Post; Pew; National Annenberg Election Study. 2002-2004.

Boomgaarden, Hajo G., and Claes H. de Vreese. 2007. “Dramatic Real-world Events and Public Opinion Dynamics: Media Coverage and its Impact on Public Reactions to an Assassination.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 19(3):354–366.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Murder of Theo van Gogh on 2 November 2004.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward immigration.
  • Survey Information: Research Survey. 2004.

Boydstun, Amber E., Jessica T. Feezell, and Rebecca A. Glazier. 2018. “In the Wake of a Terrorist Attack, do Americans’ Attitudes Toward Muslims Decline?” Research & Politics 5(4):1–7.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terror attacks in Paris and San Bernardino on November and December 2015.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward muslims.
  • Survey Information: Web-based Survey. 2015.

Bozzoli, Carlos, and Cathérine Müller. 2011. “Perceptions and Attitudes Following a Terrorist Shock: Evidence from the UK.” European Journal of Political Economy 27(S1):S89–S106.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terrorists attacks in London on 7 July 2005.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs/Policy preferences. Perception of risk and attitudes toward policies.
  • Survey Information: British Social Attitudes Survey. June-November 2005.

Branton, Regina, Valerie Martinez-Ebers, Tony E. Carey Jr., and Tetsuya Matsubayashi. 2015. “Social Protest and Policy Attitudes: The Case of the 2006 Immigrant Rallies.” American Journal of Political Science 59(2):390–402.

  • Event Information: Protest and Repression. Protests against the law H.R. 4437 in 2006.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups/Policy preferences. Preferences for immigration policy.
  • Survey InformationLatino National Survey. 2006.

Bridgman, Aengus, Costin Ciobanu, Aaron Erlich, Danielle Bohonos, and Christopher Ross. 2020. “Unveiling: the Electoral Consequences of an Exogenous Mid-campaign Court Ruling.” The Journal of Politics, forthcoming.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. Ruling of the Canadian Federal Court of Appeal affirming the right for women to wear the niqab in 2015.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Propensity to vote for the leading party.
  • Survey Information: Canadian Election Study. 2015.

Bruinsma, Bastiaan, Kostas Geminis, and Micha Germann. 2019. “The Electoral Effects of a Diplomatic Stand-off: Evidence From a Natural Experiment.” European Consortium of Political Research General Conference 2019

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. Diplomatic stand-off between Turkey and the Netherlands in 2017.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Propensities to vote for parties.
  • Survey Information: Web-based Survey. 2017.

Brugarolas, Pablo, and Luis Miller. 2021. “The Causal Effect of Polls on Turnout Intention: A Local Randomization Regression Discontinuity Approach.” Political Analysis, forthcoming.

  • Event Information: Election results. Two large pre-election polls carried out by the Spanish Sociological Research Center CIS before the April 2019 national elections.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Voter turnout.

Burlacu, Diana, Ellen M. Immergut, Maria Oskarson, and Björn Rönnerstrand. 2018. “The Politics of Credit Claiming: Rights and Recognition in Health Policy Feedback.” Social Policy & Administration 52(4):880–894.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. Maximum waiting time for health services law in Germany and Sweden (2015-2016).
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties/Policy preferences. Attitudes toward the health care system.
  • Survey Information: German Socio-Economic Panel Study Innovation Sample and Swedish Society Opinion Media. 2015 and 2016

Carey Jr, Tony E., Regina P. Branton, and Valerie Martinez-Eber. 2014. “The Influence of Social Protests on Issue Salience Among Latinos.” Political Research Quarterly 67(3):615–627.

  • Event Information: Protest and Repression. Protests against the law H.R. 4437 in 2006.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Perceptions of immigration.
  • Survey InformationLatino National Survey. 2006.

Casas, Agustín, Federico Curci, and Antoni-Italo De Moragas. 2020. “Checks and Balances and Nation Building: The Spanish Constitutional Court and Catalonia.” SIOE Conference: 2020.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. Ruling of the Spanish Consitutional Court on the Catalan Constitution in 2010.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Support for the secession of Catalonia.
  • Survey InformationCatalan Public Opinion Center Barometer. June-July 2010.

Castanho Silva, Bruno. 2018. “The (Non)Impact of the 2015 Paris Terrorist Attacks on Political Attitudes.” Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 44(6):838–850.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terror attacks in Paris on November 2015.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups/Other attitudes and beliefs. Policy preferences for immigration and refugees, xenophobia, and ideological orientation.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey. 2015.

Coupe, Tom. 2017. “The Impact of Terrorism on Expectations, Trust and Happiness – the Case of the November 13 Attacks in Paris, France.” Applied Economics Letters 24(15):1084–1087.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terror attacks in Paris on November 2015.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties/Emotions and well-being/Other attitudes and beliefs. Life satisfaction, optimism, attitudes toward incumbent and political orientation.
  • Survey Information: EuroBarometer. November 2015.

Curtice, Travis. 2021. “How Repression A ffects Public Perceptions of Police: Evidence from Uganda.” Journal of Conflict Resolution, forthcoming.

  • Event Information: Protests and Repression. Social Media Tax Protests in Uganda on 11 July 2018.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Attitudes toward the police.
  • Survey Information: Research Survey. June-July 2018

Das, Enny et al. 2009. “How Terrorism News Reports Increase Prejudice Against Outgroups: A Terror Management Account.” Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 45(3):453–459.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Murder of Theo van Gogh on 2 November 2004.
  • Outcome Information:Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward muslims.
  • Survey Information: Web-based Survey. 2004.

Depetris-Chauvin, Emilio, Ruben Durante, and Felipe R. Campante. 2020. “Building Nations Through Shared Experiences: Evidence from African Football.” American Economic Review 110(5):1572–1602.

  • Event Information: Sports. National football teams’ victories in Sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2015.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward in-groups and national identity.
  • Survey Information. Afrobarometer. 2002 to 2013.

De Vries, Catherine E. 2018. Euroscepticism and The future of European Integration. New York: Oxford University Press.

  • Event Information: Corruption. “Bárcenas” corruption scandal in Spain in 2013; “Cash for influence” corruption scandal in the European Parliament; Ahtisaari Nobel Peace Prize in Finland in 2008; Receipt of Nobel Peace Prize of the EU in 2012.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Attitudes toward EU membership and institutions.
  • Survey InformationEuropean Social Survey. 2012 Spanish survey; 2010 Cypriote survey; 2008 Finnish survey; 2012 German survey

De Vries, Catherine E., Bert N. Bakker, Sara Hobolt, and Kevin Arceneaux. 2020. “Crisis Signaling: How Italy’s Coronavirus Lockdown Affected Incumbent Support in Other European Countries.” SSRN. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3606149.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. COVID-19 lockdown in Italy in March 2020.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Incumbent support in other countries.
  • Survey InformationEupinions online survey. 2020.

Dinas, Elias, Erin Hartman, and Joost van Spanje. 2016. “Dead Man Walking: The Affective Roots of Issue Proximity Between Voters and Parties.” Political Behavior 38:659–687.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Murder of Pim Fortuyn (LFP leader) on 6 May 2002.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Proximity with political parties.
  • Survey Information: Dutch Parliamentary Election Study. 2002.

Dinesen, Peter T., and Mads M Jæger. 2013. “The Effect of Terror on Institutional Trust: New Evidence from the 3/11 Madrid Terrorist Attack.” Political Psychology 34(6):917–926.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terrorist attack in Madrid on 11 March 2004.
  • Outcome InformationAttitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Trust in political institutions, media, and justice.
  • Survey Information: EuroBarometer. 2004.

Falcó-Gimeno, Albert, and Pablo Fernandez-Vazquez. 2020. “Choices That Matter: Coalition Formation and Parties’ Ideological Reputations.” Political Science Research and Methods 8(2):285–300.

  • Event Information:  Policies and political and judicial decisions. Announcement of coalition government agreements in Germany 2009 and UK 2010.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Perceptions of party positions.
  • Survey Information: German Election Study and British Election Study Internet Panel. 2009 and 2010.

Ferrín, Mónica, Moreno Mancosu, and Teresa M. Cappiali. 2020. “Terrorist Attacks and Europeans’ Attitudes Towards Immigrants: An Experimental Approach.” European Journal of Political Research 59(3):491–516.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terror attacks in Paris on November 2015.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward immigrants.
  • Survey InformationEurobarometer. November 2015.

Finseraas, Henning, and Ola Listhaug. 2013. “It Can Happen Here: the Impact of the Mumbai Terror Attacks on Public Opinion in Western Europe.” Public Choice 156(1-2):213–228.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terror attacks in Mumbai in 2008.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs/Policy preferences. Fear of terrorism, policy preferences, and ideological orientation.
  • Survey InformationEuropean Social Survey. Fourth wave 2008.

Finseraas, Henning, Niklas Jakobsson, and Andreas Kotsadam. 2011. “Did the Murder of Theo van Gogh Change Europeans’ Immigration Policy Preferences?” Kyklos 64(3):396–409.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Murder of Theo van Gogh on 2 November 2004.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Immigration policy preferences.
  • Survey InformationEuropean Social Survey. November 2004.

Flores, René D. 2018. “Can Elites Shape Public Attitudes Toward Immigrants?: Evidence from the 2016 US Presidential Election.” Social Forces 96(4):1649–1690.

  • Event Information: Statement and Rumors. Donald Trump’s presidential campaign announcement in 2016.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward immigration.
  • Survey Information: Gallup. May-July 2016.

  • Event Information: Protests and Repression. Moscow protests after the parliamentary elections on May 2011.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Trust in government.
  • Survey Information: Research Survey. November-December 2011.

García-Ponce, Omar, and Benjamin Pasquale. 2015. “How Political Repression Shapes Attitudes Toward the State: Evidence from Zimbabwe.” http://omargarciaponce.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/GarciaPonce_and_Pasquale_2014.pdf.

  • Event Information: Protests and Repression. State repression events in Zimbabwe from 2004 to 2010.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Trust in the state, the president, and the ruling party.
  • Survey Information: Afrobarometer. 2004, 2005 and 2009

Geys, Benny, and Salmai Qari. 2017. “Will You Still Trust Me Tomorrow? The Causal Effect of Terrorism on Social Trust.” Public Choice 173(3-4):289–305.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Stockholm bombs on 11 December 2010.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Social trust.
  • Survey Information: Swedish Society Opinion Media. 2010.

Giani, Marco. 2021. “Fear Without Prejudice in the Shadow of Jihadist Threat.” Comparative Political Studies 54(6):1058–1085.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Jihadist attacks ocurred between 2002 and 2016.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward immigration.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey. 2016.

Gorman, Brandon, and Charles Seguin. 2018. “World Citizens on the Periphery: Threat and Identification with Global Society.” American Journal of Sociology, 124(3):705-761.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terror attack in Beirut (Lebanon) in July 2013.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Attitudes toward globalization and openness.
  • Survey InformationArab Barometer. Third wave 2013.

Hanaoka, Chie, Hitoshi Shigeoka, and Yasutora Watanabe. 2018.Do Risk Preferences Change? Evidence from the Great East Japan Earthquake.” American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 10(2):298–330.

  • Event Information: Accidents, fatalities, disasters, and epidemics. 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Risk preferences.
  • Survey Information: Japan Household Panel Survey on Consumer Preferences and Satisfaction. 2011.

Hariri, Jacob G., Christian Bjørnskov, and Mogens K. Justesen. 2016. “Economic Shocks and Subjective Well-being: Evidence from a Quasi-experiment.World Bank Economic Review 30(1):55–77.

  • Event Information: Economic Shocks. Currency devaluation in Botswana on May 2005.
  • Outcome Information: Emotions and well-being. Subjective well-being.
  • Survey Information: Afrobarometer. 2005.

Hartnett, Rodney T., and Carol U. Libby. 1968. Agreement With Views of Martin Luther King, Jr. Before and After his Assassination.“ ETS Research Bulletin Series, 1968(2):i–15.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Murder of Martin Luther King on 4 April 1968.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Proximity to Dr. Martin Luther King’s views.
  • Survey InformationResearch Survey. 1968.

Healy, Andrew J., Neil Malhotra, and Cecilia H. Mo. 2010.Irrelevant Events Affect Voters’ Evaluations of Government Performance.”

  • Event Information: Sports. 2009 NCAA men’s college basketball tournament’s results.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Presidential approval.
  • Survey InformationResearch Survey. 2009.

Hofstetter, C. Richard. 1969. “Political Disengagement and the Death of Martin Luther King.” Public Opinion Quarterly 33(2):174–179.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Murder of Martin Luther King on 4 April 1968.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Personal affect toward components of the political system.
  • Survey InformationResearch Survey. 1968.

Holbrook, Thomas M., Clayton Clouse, and Aaron C. Weinschenk. 2012. “Bringing the President Back in: The Collapse of Lehman Brothers and the Evolution of Retrospective Voting in the 2008 Presidential Election.” Political Research Quarterly 65(2):263–274.

  • Event Information: Economic Shocks. Lehman Brothers collapse in 2008.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Retrospective voting.
  • Survey Information: American National Election Study. 2008-2009.

Jakiela, Pamela, and Owen Ozier. 2019. “The Impact of Violence on Individual Risk Preferences: Evidence from a Natural Experiment. The Review of Economics and Statistics 101(3): 547-559.

  • Event Information: Election Results. Kenya’s 2007 post-election crisis.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Risk aversion.
  • Survey Information: Kenyan Life Panel Survey. 2007-2009.

Jakobsson, Niklas, and Svein Blom. 2014. “Did the 2011 Terror Attacks in Norway Change Citizens’ Attitudes Toward Immigrants?” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 26(4):475–486.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Oslo and Utøya attacks on 22 July 2011.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward immigration.
  • Survey Information: Statistics Norway’s survey on attitudes toward immigrants. 2011.

Jensen, Carsten, and Elias Naumann. 2016. “Increasing Pressures and Support for Public Healthcare in Europe.” Health Policy 120(6):698–705.

  • Event Information: Others. Flu epidemic in 2008.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Attitudes toward the health care system.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey. 2008.

Kim, Jin W., and Eunji Kim. 2019. “Identifying the Effect of Political Rumor Diffusion Using Variations in Survey Timing.” Quarterly Journal of Political Science 14(3):293-311.

  • Event Information: Statement and rumors. Spread of “Obama-is-a-Muslim” rumor in September 2008.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Rumor diffusion.
  • Survey Information: American National Election Study. 2008.

Krosnick, Jon A., and Donald R. Kinder. 1990. “Altering the Foundations of Support for the President Through Priming.” American Political Science Review 84(2):497–512.

  • Event Information: Corruption. Disclosure of diversion of funds to Nicaraguan Contras from secret sale of weapons to Iran in 1986.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Support for the incumbent.
  • Survey Information: American National Election Study. 1986.

Larsen, Erik G. 2018. “Welfare Retrenchments and Government Support: Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” European Sociological Review 34(1):40–51.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. Retrechment reform of the education grant system in Denmark in 2013.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Government support.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey. 2013.

Larsen, Erik G., David Cutts, and Matthew J. Goodwin. 2020. “Do Terrorist Attacks Feed Populist Eurosceptics? Evidence from Two Comparative Quasi-experiments.” European Journal of Political Research 59(1):182-205.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Chirstmas market terror attack in Berlin in 2016.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups/Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Attitudes toward immigrants, refugees, and the EU.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey and Chatam House Survey. 2016 and 2016-2017.

Legewie, Joscha. 2013. “Terrorist Events and Attitudes Toward Immigrants: A Natural Experiment.” American Journal of Sociology 118(5):1199–1245.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terrorists attacks in Bali on 12 October 2002.
  • Outcome InformationAttitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward immigrants.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey. 2002.

Lever, H. 1969. “The Johannesburg Station Explosion and Ethnic Attitudes.” Public Opinion Quarterly 33(2):180–189.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Explosion in the Johannesburg railway station on 24 July 1964.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward out-groups.
  • Survey Information: Research Survey. May-September 1964.

Marco, Giani, and Pierre-Guillaume Méon. 2019. “Global Racist Contagion Following Donald Trump’s Election.” British Journal of Political Science:1-8.

  • Event Information: Election Results. Trump’s victory in 2016 US presidential elections.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward race-targeting policies.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey. 2016

Merler, Silvia. 2021. “Technocracy, Trust and Democracy: Evidence on Citizens’ Attitudes from a Natural Experiment in Italy.” Government and Opposition 56(2):301–325.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. Appointment of the Monti technocratic cabinet in 2011.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Satisfaction with democracy.
  • Survey Information: EuroBarometer. November 2011.

Metcalfe, Robert, Nattavudh Powdthavee, and Paul Dolan. 2011. “Destruction and Distress: Using a Quasi-experiment to Show the Effects of the September 11 Attacks on Mental Wellbeing in the United Kingdom.” The Economic Journal 121(550):F81–F103.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. World Trade Center attacks on 11 September 2001.
  • Outcome Information: Emotions and well-being. Subjective well-being.
  • Survey Information: British Household Panel Survey. 2001.

Mikulaschek, Cristhoph, Saurabh Pant, and Beza Tesfaye. 2020. Winning Hearts and Minds in Civil Wars: Governance, Leadership Change, and Support for Violent Groups in Iraq.” American Journal of Political Sciences 64(4):773–790.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. Resignation of Iraq’s prime minister in August 2014.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Attitudes toward the Iraqi’s government, oppostion groups, and the political system.
  • Survey Information: Private National Survey. 2014.

Minkus, Lara, Emanuel Deutschmann, and Jan Delhey. 2018. “A Trump Effect on the EU’s Popularity? The US Presidential Election as a Natural Experiment.” Perspectives on Politics 17(2):399–416.

  • Event Information: Election Results. Trump’s victory in 2016 US presidential elections.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Attitudes toward the EU.
  • Survey Information: EuroBarometer. November 2016.

Müller, Stefan, and Liam Kneafsey. 2021. “Evidence for the Irrelevance of Irrelevant Events.” https://muellerstefan.net/papers/mueller_kneafsey_irrelevance_irrelevant_events.pdf.

  • Event Information: Sports. 2002 and 2007 All-Ireland Championships results.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Voting for the incumbent.
  • Survey Information: Irish National Election Study. 2002 and 2007.

Muñoz, Jordi and Eva Anduiza. 2019. “‘If a Fight Starts, Watch the Crowd’: The Effect of Violence on Popular Support for Social Movements.” Journal of Peace Research 56(4):485–498.

  • Event Information: Protests and Repression. Barcelona riots following eviction of a squat group bank May 2016.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Support for social movement.
  • Survey Information: Research Survey. May 2016.

Nägel, Christof, and Mark Lutter. 2020. The Christmas Market Attack in Berlin and Attitudes Toward Refugees: a Natural Experiment With Data from the European Social Survey.” European Journal of Security Research 5:199–221.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Christmas market terror attack in Berlin in 2016.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward refugees.
  • Survey InformationEuropean Social Survey. Germany 2016-2017.

Nagoshi, Julie L., Heather K. Terrell, and Craig T. Nagoshi. 2007. “Changes in Authoritarianism and Coping in College Students Immediately After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001.” Personality and Individual Differences 43(7):1722–1732.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. World Trade Center attacks on 11 September 2001.
  • Outcome Information: Emotions and well-being/Other attitudes and beliefs. Emotional state, coping strategies, authoritarianism, and social dominance.
  • Survey Information: Research Survey. Arizona University September 2001.

Nussio, Enzo. 2020. “Attitudinal and Emotional Consequences of Islamist Terrorism. Evidence from the Berlin Attack.” Political Psychology 41(6):1151–1171.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Christmas market terror attack in Berlin in 2016.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups/Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties/Emotions and well-being. Emotional state, trust in government, national identification, and attitudes toward religion.
  • Survey Information: GESIS. 2017.

Nussio, Enzo, Vincenzo Bove, and Bridget Steele. 2019. “The Consequences of Terrorism on Migration Attitudes Across Europe.” Political Geography 75:102047.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terror attacks in Paris in November 2015.
  • Outcome InformationAttitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups.Attitudes toward immigrants and refugees.
  • Survey Information: EuroBarometer. 2015.

Ojeda, Christopher. 2016. “The Effect of 9/11 on the Heritability of Political Trust.” Political Psychology 37(1):73–88.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. World Trade Center attacks on 11 September 2001.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Trust in government.
  • Survey Information: National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Third wave, 2001.

Perrin, Andrew J., and Sondra J. Smolek. 2009. “Who Trusts? Race, Gender, and the September 11 Rally Effect Among Young Adults.” Social Science Research 38(1):134–145.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. World Trade Center attacks on 11 September 2001.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Trust in government.
  • Survey Information: National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Third wave, 2001.

Pierce, Laman, Todd Rogers, and Jason A. Snyder. 2016. “Losing Hurts: The Happiness Impact of Partisan Electoral Loss.” Journal of Experimental Political Science 3(1):44–59.

  • Event Information: Election Results. Results of 2012 US presidential election.
  • Outcome Information: Emotions and well-being. Happiness.
  • Survey Information: United States General Social Survey. 2012.

Raskin, Yoav, and Tal Sadeh. 2020. “Doomed to Alienate? How European Integration Feeds Euroscepticism.” https://www.peio.me/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/PEIO13_paper_40_1.pdf.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. EU integration events
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Euroscepticism.
  • Survey Information: Eurobarometer. Survey 39.1/ Danish TEU referendum. 2006.

Reeves, Aaron, and de Robert Vries. 2016. “Does Media Coverage Influence Public Attitudes Towards Welfare Recipients? The Impact of the 2011 English Riots.” The British Journal of Sociology 67(2):281–306.

  • Event Information: Protests and Repression. Shooting of Mark Duggan by police on 4 august 2011.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward welfare recipients.
  • Survey Information: Brittish Social Attitudes Survey. 2011.

Schaffner, Brian F., and Cameron Roche. 2017. “Misinformation and Motivated Reasoning: Responses to Economic News in a Politicized Environment.” Public Opinion Quarterly 81(1):86-110.

  • Event Information: Policies and Political Decesions. Announcement of unemployment rate during Obama’s presidency.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Accuracy of unemployment perceptions.
  • Survey Information: Cooperative Congressional Election Study. 2010-2012.

Schraff, Dominik. 2020. “Asymmetric Political Trust During the Covid-19 Pandemic: Rally Around the Flag or Lockdown Effects?” SocArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/pu47c.

  • Event Information: Accidents, fatalities, disasters, and epidemics. Covid-19 infections and lockdowns.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Political trust.
  • Survey Information: Dutch Household Survey. March 2020.

Schraff, Dominik. 2020. “Political Trust During the Covid-19 Pandemic: Rally Around the Flag or Lockdown Effects?” SocArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/pu47c.

  • Event Information: Accidents, fatalities, disasters, and epidemics. Covid-19 infections and lockdowns.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Political trust.
  • Survey Information: Dutch Household Survey. March 2020.

Schulz, Peter J., Kent Nakamoto, Uwe Hartung, and Carmen Faustinelli. 2008. “The Death of Rosmarie Voser: The Not-so-harmful Consequences of a Fatal Medical Error.” International Journal of Public Opinion Research 20(3):386–397.

  • Event Information: Accidents, fatalities, disasters, and epidemics. Death of Rosmarie Voser after heart transplant in 2004.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Attitudes toward organ donation
  • Survey Information: Reasearch Survey. 2004.

Schwartz, Cassilde, Miranda Simon, David Hudson, and Jennifer van-Heerde-Hudson. 2020. “A Populist Paradox? How Brexit Softened Anti-immigrant Attitudes.” British Journal of Political Science:1-21.

  • Event Information: Election Results. Brexit Referendum in 2016.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Anti-immigrant attitudes.
  • Survey InformationOnline Survey. Aid Attitudes Tracker. 2015-2017.

Silber Mohamed, Heather. 2013. “Can Protests Make Latinos “American”? Identity, Immigration Politics, and the 2006 Marches.” American Politics Research 41(2):298–327.

  • Event Information: Protest and Repression. Protests against the law H.R. 4437 in 2006.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Ethnic identity.
  • Survey Information: Latino National Survey. 2006.

Slothuus, Rune. 2010. “When Can Political Parties Lead Public Opinion? Evidence from a Natural Experiment.” Political Communication 27(2):158–177.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. Shifts in party frames of salient political issues.
  • Outcome Information: Policy preferences. Policy preferences.
  • Survey Information: Danish National Election Survey. 2005.

Solaz, Hector, Catherine E. De Vries, and Roosmarijin A. de Geus. 2019. “In-Group Loyalty and the Punishment of Corruption.” Comparative Political Studies 52(6):896–926.

  • Event Information: Corruption. “Bárcenas” corruption scandal in Spain in 2013.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Support for the incumbent.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey. 2012 Spanish wave.

Solodoch, Omer. 2019. “Regaining Control? The Political Impact of Policy Responses to Refugee Crises.” International Organization, Forthcoming.

  • Event Information: Policies and political and judicial decisions. Swedish border controls (2015-2016) and the EU-Turkey Agreement (2016).
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward immigration and support for radical-right parties.
  • Survey Information: EuroBarometer. November 2014-May 2015.

Turnbull-Dugarte, Stuart J, and José Rama. 2021. “When the US Far-right Sneezes, the European Far-right Catches a Cold. Quasi-experimental of Electoral Contagion from Spain.” OSF Preprints. https://doi.org/10.31219/osf.io/s6fmj.

  • Event Information: Election results. Trump’s electoral defeat in the US (2020).
  • Outcome InformationAttitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Support for radical-right party.
  • Survey Information: Spanish CIS survey 3300. November 2020.

Valentim, Vicente. 2018. “Creating Critical Citizens? Anti-austerity Protests and Public Opinion.” Electoral Studies, forthcoming.

  • Event Information: Protest and Repression. Anti-austerity Protest in Portugal on 12 March 2011.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward institutions, politicians, and parties. Attitudes toward elites and political engagement.
  • Survey Information: European Social Survey. Portuguese wave 2011.

Van Hauawaert, Steven M., and Robert A. Huber. 2020. “In-group Solidarity or Out-group Hostility in Response to Terrorism in France? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design.” European Journal of Political Research 59(4):936–953.

  • Event Information: Terrorism. Terror attacks in Paris on November 2015.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Attitudes toward out-groups and in-group.
  • Survey Information: France DREES Barometer. 2015.

Wicki, Michael. 2020. “Ambitious Mobility Policies and Public Opinion: Doomed to Fail?” PhD diss. ETH Zurich.

  • Event Information: Accidents, fatalities, disasters, and epidemics. Accidental killing of pedestrain by self-driving vehicle in Arizona in 2018.
  • Outcome Information: Other attitudes and beliefs. Attitudes toward self-driving vehicles.
  • Survey Information: Research Survey. 2018.

Zepeda-Millán, Chris, and Sophia J. Wallace. 2013. “Racialization in Times of Contention: How Social Movements Influence Latino Racial Identity.” Politics, Groups, and Identities 1(4):510–527.

  • Event Information: Protest and Repression. Protests against the law H.R. 4437 in 2006.
  • Outcome Information: Attitudes toward immigration, ethnic groups, and other out-groups. Racial identity.
  • Survey Information: Latino National Survey. 2006.

 

 

 

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